Towards a Classification to Facilitate the Design of Domain-Specific Visual Languages

  • Sándor Bácsi Department of Automation and Applied Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Magyar tudósok krt. 2., H-1117 Budapest and Hungary https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4814-6979
  • Gergely Mezei, PhD Department of Automation and Applied Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Magyar tudósok krt. 2., H-1117 Budapest and Hungary https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9464-7128
Keywords: domain-specific visual languages, modeling, classification

Abstract

Domain-specific visual languages (DSVLs) are specialized modeling languages that allow the effective management of the behavior and the structure of software programs and systems in a specific domain. Each DSVL has its specific structural and graphical characteristics depending on the problem domain. In the recent decade, a wide range of tools and methodologies have been introduced to support the design of DSVLs for various domains, therefore it can be a challenging task to choose the most appropriate technique for the design process. Our research aims to present a classification to guide the identification of the most relevant and appropriate methodologies in the given scenario. The classification is capable enough to provide a clear and precise understanding of the main aspects that can facilitate the design of DSVLs.

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Published
2019-05-21
How to Cite
Bácsi, S., & Mezei, G. (2019). Towards a Classification to Facilitate the Design of Domain-Specific Visual Languages. Acta Cybernetica, 24(1), 5-16. https://doi.org/10.14232/actacyb.24.1.2019.2
Section
Special Issue of the 11th Conference of PhD Students in Computer Science